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508 E. GREEN LANE, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19128

Lager

Lagers are the most popular beer in the United States and are primarily characterized by the use of bottom- fermenting yeast. Lagers are usually cleaner- tasting than ale, with less body and less hop flavor, and a lower alcohol level. There are many more styles of beer that are classified as lager. Other bottom- fermented styles would include Bock, Steam Beer, Dopplebock, Dunkel, Marzen/Oktoberfest, and Dortmunder. Most beer produced in Germany is of the lager variety. In fact, many of these lager styles originated in Germany.



IPA

India Pale Ale is often bitter with complex flavors. It’s no accident that IPA was given its name. This style of beer was named after India. The English created this type of beer because they needed a malt beverage that could survive the voyage to India. The alcohol level of IPA is often higher than other beers, ranging from 5 percent to 8 percent by volume. The original gravity is also higher, falling in the 1.050 to 1.080 range, and the ending gravity is usually in the range of 1.010 to 1.016. The IBU (International Bittering Units) ranges from moderate to extreme. We have had some IPA that were rated 40 IBU, and some as high as 80 IBU.

Some good IPA that we have tried over the years would include Samuel Smith India Ale; Brooklyn East India Pale Ale; Goose Island IPA; Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale; Great Lakes Brewing Company Commodore Perry IPA



Stout

This style of beer is brewed using roasted unmalted barley, pale malt, and sometimes caramel malt, along with generous amounts of hops. Stouts are often divided into four separate categories, based on sweetness level and alcohol content. The categories are:

1. Dry Stout: This type is dark black in color and often has a coffee- like taste and a roasted character. Guinness is the most popular of all dry stouts. The majority of stout produced in Ireland is of the dry variety. The alcohol level in these stouts varies, and people are often fooled into thinking that, because they are flavorful, there must be a high alcohol content. This isn’t always the case. Guinness, for example, actually has less alcohol than many popular American beers.

2. Milk Stout: These stouts also have a dark color. They usually are a little lower in alcohol than dry stout. Their main characteristic is the addition of milk sugar (lactose) in the brewing process, making the stout taste sweeter and smoother than dry stout.

3. Imperial Stout: Again, Imperial stout is dark in color, but it can sometimes be more of a dark brown than black. The thing that sets this stout apart from the others is the stronger alcohol content, which usually ranges between 6 and 11 percent by volume. Originally, this type of stout was brewed for consumption by people in Russia, to help them stay warm during the frigid winter months. The high alcohol content is evident in this type of stout, especially in the finish.

4. Oatmeal Stout: This type of stout is similar to milk stout, but it’s even more sweet and silky and it usually has a bittersweet finish. The addition of oats makes it this way. The sweetness of this beer makes it a good companion with sweet desserts. Oatmeal stout was first recognized for its nutritional value and it was popular in England with nursing mothers and athletes.

Great Brands of Stout to Sample:
There are many excellent stout beers that are available in most parts of the country. Some of our personal favorites include Guinness Stout; Beamish Stout; Sam Smith’s Imperial Stout; Sam Smith’s Oatmeal Stout; Sierra Nevada Stout;  Sam Adams Cream Stout; . At Worldwide Beverage, you can find some excellent stout beer.



Porter

Porter is one of the many great styles of beer on the market. It’s dark, rich and hearty.Porter is a dark, top- fermented beer. It’s usually a little lighter than stout, although it’s similar in appearance. It’s made with dried brown malt, along with other types of malt (which vary from brewer to brewer) and a generous amount of hops. The fermentation of porter involves ale yeast and it’s alcohol level is typically in the range of 4.5% to 6% by volume. Porter usually has more malt and more ingredients overall, you can expect it to be more filling and have more calories than the average beer. A good glass of porter has a full- bodied taste that’s strong and malty. The flavor profile is usually one of roasted malt, and there’s sometimes the flavor of coffee, caramel, chocolate, and/or burnt malt. Many craft brewers have taken this a step further by introducing their own unique ingredient into the brewing process, like honey, maple syrup, additional smoked flavoring, etc.

Porters that you can easily find at Worldwide Beverage include Yuengling Porter, Great Lakes Edmund Fitzgerald, Breckenridge Vanilla Porter(Brew Crew favorite)



Wheat Beer

Wheat beer is lighter and more highly carbonated, making it a great summer companion. Wheat beer is a type of ale, because it’s brewed using top- fermenting yeast. We have seen an occasional wheat beer that was brewed as a lager, but the majority are ales. This style of beer is usually brewed without much filtering, producing a hazy appearance. Wheat beer is brewed with a mixture of wheat malt and barley malt.The alcohol level in wheat beer is usually moderate, falling in the range of 4% to 6% by volume. Wheat beers are not all the same. The German variety is the most popular. It’s referred to as “weissbier” or “weizen”, and it’s characterized by a golden color and the taste of cereal grains. Another style is “Hefeweizen” which is made with wheat and other ingredients and often has several complex flavors, like clove, banana, bubble gum, and many others. In Belgium, they brew a wheat beer that’s simply called “Belgian White” and this style is usually more yellowish in color and is characterized by a citrus aroma and a fruity taste.

If you haven’t tried wheat beer, go ahead and imbibe some when you get the chance. It’s a very acceptable style of beer that most anyone will enjoy! 

Worldwide Beverage carry's a large variety of all Wheat Styles. Stop in and ask the staff for help finding the best wheat style for you.